OB Pier and Tidepools | Ocean Beach San Diego CA

OB Pier and Tidepools

Ocean Beach Fishing Pier

Interesting Facts...

  • Originally Named the San Diego Fishing Pier. The original plaque is still there.
  • Over 500,000 Visitors Per Year.
  • At 1971 Feet It Is the Longest Concrete Pier on the West Coast. The Pier at Santa Cruz is 2745 Feet, Making it the Longest in the State.
  • The 1st Fish Caught on the Pier was an 8-inch Perch. The 2nd and 3rd Fish Caught were a Gray Shark and a Crab.
  • Often Called the "Queen Fish", Herring is the Most Common Fish Caught on the Pier. There is NO LIMIT!
  • Then CA Governor Edmund G. Brown Made the First Cast Off the OB Pier and Reportedly Fished for 5 minutes. Brown caught nothing and was defeated in November. (Coincidence?)
  • Currently No Fishing License is Required on the Pier.
  • In 1991 over $2 Million was Spent on the Pier to Repair Damages Caused by Winter Storms.

If you have a memory to share, please do so via the "Pierbook" form.


More about the OB Pier

The Ocean Beach Municipal Pier, one of the most visited landmarks in San Diego County, was officially christened and introduced to eager San Diegans on July 2, 1966. Over 7,000 of San Diego's then 600,000 residents showed up to celebrate the opening, including local politicians Mayor Frank Curran and California Governor Edmund G. "Pat" Brown who had the honor of cutting the ribbon.

Although the pier quickly became a popular destination for locals and tourists, its original purpose was for fishing. Local Ocean Beach fishermen needed a way to prevent their fishing lines and lures from getting tangled in the vast kelp and rock beds that lie near the surface of the water near the shores. With the construction of the OB Pier, anglers are able to fish in 25-30 feet of water, avoiding most of the shoreline kelp and enabling them to catch species of fish that live in deeper waters. The pier extends 1971 feet into the ocean and is purported to be the longest concrete fishing pier on the west coast. Its unique T-shape at the end of the pier adds 360 feet to the south and 193 feet to the north.

The OB Pier was not the first attempt at providing OB residents a place to fish. Prior to the completion of the pier, a bridge had been constructed in 1915 across the mouth of Mission Bay, which extended from the north end of Bacon Street to what is now the dunes of Mission Bay. This bridge, which was 1,500 feet long, was mainly built so residents could travel from Voltaire to Mission Beach. Soon after its construction, local fishermen thought they had finally found a place to fish. Though the bridge served its primary purpose as a means of transportation for local residents, it proved to be a poor solution for the town's fishermen. When safety concerns and issues with flood control eventually resulted in the bridge becoming derelict and ultimately demolished., San Diegans were promised a replacement for the tourists and fishermen who enjoyed it. Construction began on another fishing option – a steel pier at the foot of Del Monte Avenue – in the early 1940s. Due to World War II steel shortages, construction was halted, and the pier was never completed. In 1966, the city finally came through on its promise and opened what is now the OB Pier at the foot of Niagara, a location proven better suited for tourists and anglers alike.

Tidepools

San Diego Ocean Beach Fishing Pier and Tidepools and Sealife
San Diego Ocean Beach Fishing Pier and Tidepools

Photos Courtesy of: Josh Utley - Please respect sealife and put it back wher eyou found it. (=

For the Best Experience We Recommend You Visit the Tidepools During Low Tide.

The Ocean Beach Tidepools are Located at the foot of Newport Ave. Beneath the Pier.

To view the Ocean Beach Tide Table Click Here

To view the full photo album click on one of the above images or Click Here


 


OB Pier History

Thanks to all the OB Pier fans who have submitted stories, photos, and memories for your enjoyment below. If you have a memory, photo, or story to share, please do so using the "Pierbook" form.


OB Pier History, Construction, & Opening Weekend Video

OB Pier History, Construction, & Opening Weekend Video

Learn about the history, construction, and opening weekend celebration for the Ocean Beach Pier. This video, filmed and produced by local OB resident Matthew O'Connor, features Leonard Teyssier, contractor for the OB Pier, and Chuck Bahde, who headed up the committee that commissioned the pier, and historical footage of the opening weekend in 1966...

OB Pier Opening Weekend

OB Pier Opening Weekend

Local photographer Stephen Rowell has generously shared this image of the OB Pier's opening celebration on July 2-4, 1966. The festivities included a parade, a talent contest, a variety show, and a sand castle competition, among other activites...

OB Pier Opening Celebration Program

Pier Opening Celebration Program

Page through the original program for the OB Pier's Opening Celebration from July 2 through 4, 1966!

Mission Bay Bridge - photo courtesy of Ocean Beach Historical Society

Predecessors to the OB Pier

The OB Pier at the end of Niagara Avenue was not the first attempt at creating a fishing spot in Ocean Beach. Prior to the pier's opening in 1966, OB boasted two other structures that stretched into the water and provided a location for fishing: the Mission Bay Bridge and the Del Monte Ave Pier.

OB Pier Construction Photos from Teyssier & Teyssier

OB Pier Construction Photos from Teyssier & Teyssier

Leonard Teyssier, contractor for the OB Pier, has generously shared these images of the pier being built in 1965 and 1966, courtesy of his company Teyssier & Teyssier.

San Diego Union Coverage of 1966 Pier Opening

San Diego Union Coverage of 1966 Pier Opening

The San Diego Union (now the San Diego Union-Tribune) reported that 7000 people attended the official opening of the Ocean Beach Pier the first weekend of July 1966. This press clipping shows photos and captions about some of the weekend's events.

Aerial Pier Photos from Teyssier & Teyssier

Aerial Pier Photos from Teyssier & Teyssier

Leonard Teyssier, the contractor whose company Teyssier & Teyssier built the OB Pier, has generously shared these images of the pier from the air.

Mike Sturak, Resident Engineer for Pier Construction

Mike Sturak, Resident Engineer for Pier Construction

"My father-in-law Mike Sturak was the Resident Engineer from San Diego Engineering Department for the pier construction and while he held other major responsibilities such as for the Sewage Treatment Plant on the end of Point Loma, the pier was the work he was most proud of. He spent week ends and evenings during construction walking the pier and making sure that all was done just right..."

OB Pier Photos by Jim Grant

OB Pier Photos by Jim Grant

Local photographer Jim Grant has generously shared some of his stunning images of the OB Pier...

OB Pier Photo by Joe Ewing

OB Pier Photos by Joe Ewing

Local photographer Joe Ewing has generously shared some of his stunning images of the OB Pier.

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